Monday, September 1, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #32 Mary Edwards

Mary Edwards

Mary Edwards was born in 1615 in Postslade, Sussex, England, as the first child of John Edwards and Elizabeth Whitfield. She had six siblings, namely: Martha, Francis E, Jane, Elizebeth, John, and Rice. She died on 07 Dec 1693 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States. When she was 21, she married Francis Brown,son of Francis Brown and Elizabeth Brewster, in 1636 in England. When she was 53, she married William Payne,son of William Payne and Anna North, in 1668 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States.

Mary Edwards arrived in Came to Boston in 1637 (Came on the "Hector"). She arrived in New Haven, Connecticut in 1639.

Francis Brown and Mary Edwards had the following children:

1.  Lydia Brown was born on 29 Jan 1636 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States. She died in 1719 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States. She married Henry Bristol on 29 Jan 1656 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States.
2.  Samuel Brown was born on 07 Aug 1645 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States. He died on 06 Nov 1691 in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut, United States. He married Mercy Tuttle on 02 May 1667 in New Haven, New Haven, CT.
3.  Eleazer Brown was born on 10 Oct 1642 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States. He died on 23 Oct 1714 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States (Age: 72). He married Sarah Bulkeley in 1663 in New Haven, CT.
4.  John Brown was born on 07 Apr 1640 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States. He died on 06 Nov 1690 in Newark, Essex, New Jersey, United States.
5.  Ebenezer Brown was born on 21 Jun 1646 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States. He died on 03 Mar 1739 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States (Age: 92). He married Hannah Vincent on 28 Mar 1667 in New Haven, New Haven, CT.
6.  Francis BROWN was born in 1630 in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut, United States. He died in 1686 in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut, United States.
 7.  Rebecca Brown was born in 1627 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States. She died in 1655 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States.

William Payne and Mary Edwards had the following children:

      1.  John  was born in 1649 in New Haven, CT. He died on 04 Jun 1729 in New Haven, CT.
      2   Elizabeth Payne was born on 06 Mar 1648 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.             She died on 19 Sep 1718 in Dedham, Norfolk, MA (Age: 70). She married Thomas Sanford on 11 Oct 1666 in United States. She married Obadiah Allen on 21 Oct 1669 in United States.
Haven, CT.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #31 Stella M Van Dorn

Stella M Van Doren

Stella M Van Doren was born about 1873 in Tamaqua, Schuylkill, Pennsylvania as the first child of Theodore Van Doren and Rachael M. Lindner. She had nine siblings, namely: Miles Calvin, Emma, Eliza, Olive B, Adolph Benjamin, Abigail, Louisa, Mary Melinde, and John. She died in camden,nj. When she was 20, she married John Grossmick,son of Frederick Grossmick and Maria Sophia Klehm, on 27 Sep 1893 in Camden,Camden County, New Jersey, German Evang .Luth. Trinity Church.
Stella M Van Doren lived in Tamaqua, Schuylkill, Pennsylvania, United States in 1880 (Age: 7; Marital Status: Single; Relation to Head of House: Daughter). She lived in Camden, New Jersey, USA in 1897. She lived in Camden Ward 11, Camden, New Jersey in 1900. She lived in Camden Ward 11, Camden, New Jersey in 1910 (Age: 39; Marital Status: Married; Relation to Head of House: Wife). She lived in Camden, New Jersey, USA in 1911. She lived in Camden, New Jersey, USA in 1912. She lived in Camden, New Jersey, USA in 1913. She lived in Camden, New Jersey, USA in 1914. She lived in Camden, New Jersey, USA in 1915. She lived in Camden, New Jersey, USA in 1916. She lived in Camden, New Jersey, USA in 1917. She lived in Camden Ward 11, Camden, New Jersey in 1920 (Age: 43; Marital Status: Married; Relation to Head of House: Wife). She lived in Camden Ward 11, Camden, New Jersey in 1920 (1032 N. 25th St.). She lived in Camden, New Jersey, USA in 1923. She lived in Camden, New Jersey, USA in 1926. She lived in Camden, New Jersey, USA in 1928 (Listed as Widow of John, 1032 N. 25th Street, Cramer Hill section of Camden, New Jersey.). She lived in Camden, Camden, New Jersey in 1930 (Age: 56; Marital Status: Widowed; Relation to Head of House: Head). She lived in 25th Street, Camden, Camden, New Jersey in 1930 (Widowed, lives next door to Erickson's).

John Grossmick and Stella M Van Doren had the following children:

Florence May Grossmick was born in Dec 1897 in Stockton, Camden, New Jersey. She died in Camden NJ. She married William James Deerr on 23 Jul 1917 in Elkton, Cecil County, Maryland.
Clara May Grossmick was born on 06 Apr 1894 in N.Cramer Hill, Camden Twsp, New Jersey. She married Arthur Hummell on 23 Aug 1915 in Elkton, Cecil County, Maryland.
Lester John Grossmick was born on 25 Apr 1896 in Camden, New Jersey, USA,. He died in May 1964 in Camden, Camden, New Jersey, United States.
Troy Grossmick was born in Dec 1897 in New Jersey.

Monday, August 25, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #30 Margaret Snedeker

Margaret Ann Snedeker


Margaret Ann Snedeker was born on 15 Jul 1856 in Middlesex, Middlesex, New Jersey, United States as the first child of Richard Snedeker and Mary Smith. She had eight siblings, namely: James, Isaac, John, Violette Lettie, Aaron, Ella May, Charles S Olden, and Kenneth.

Margaret Ann Snedeker lived in Kingwood, Hunterdon, New Jersey, United States in 1860. She lived in Kingwood, Hunterdon, New Jersey, United States in 1860. She lived in South Brunswick, Middlesex, New Jersey, United States in 1870. She lived in South Brunswick, Middlesex, New Jersey, United States in 1870. She lived in South Brunswick, Middlesex, New Jersey, United States in 1880. She lived in South Brunswick, Middlesex, New Jersey, United States in 1880 (1880 United States Federal Cenus). She lived in North Brunswick, Middlesex, New Jersey in 1900. She lived in Milltown Borough, Middlesex County, New Jersey, USA in 1900.

Edward Deer and Margaret Ann Snedeker had the following children:

William Deerr was born on 07 Sep 1879 in NJ. He died on 14 Oct 1950 in Camden City, Camden County, New Jersey. He married Maggy May Thompson on 31 Jan 1894 in M.E. Church, Milltown, New Jersey.
Mary Deer was born about 1877 in New Jersey, USA.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #29 Jessie Mae Bristol

Jessie Mae Bristol


My great grandfather’s older sister, Jessie Mae Bristol, was born October 8, 1871 in (probably Avon) New York. Her parents were Charles Brown Bristol and Adrianna Mary Miller. Besides my great grandfather, William Augustus Bristol, there was also a younger
sister, Mary Norton Bristol. The 1875 New York State Census and the 1880 Federal Census lists her as living with her parents in Lima, New York. In 1882 her father was living in Grafton, Dakota Territory. It is not known if the family was with him at the time but on November 22, 1886 her mother died in Grafton so more than likely the children were living there too. His father continued to live in Grafton until September, 1890 when they moved to Great Falls, Montana. Life for the children was probably not ideal as Grafton would have been the wild west at that time and Charles owned a gambling house. For me it conjures up images of the TV series “Deadwood”. In Great Falls Charles ran a boarding house. Then on February 10, 1892 Charles died. The obituary in the paper reported that William and Jessie were with their father at the time of his death but Mary was in Florida (whether living or visiting it’s not known). After this it appeared that she went to live with her aunt, Sarah Bristol Goodrich. On November 17, 1896 she married William VanZandt Sackett. The marriage took place in Lima, NY with the Episcopal minister, Rev. A.K. Bates officiating. Miss Charlotte M. Howard of Fairport, NY ,was the bridesmaid. Mr. Frank Kellogg of Avon, NY was  bestman. HefFlowergirl was Miss Ruby VanZandt of Avon, NY. The bride
given away by her aunt, Mrs. Goodrich. Miss Frances J. Parker, pianist. After the wedding the couple made an extended trip West and then moved to Rochester. (from newspaper clipping of wedding announcement). She lived in Olean, New York for a number of years before moving to Elmira, New York. It was reported that she met her husband at the train depot each day and that they walked home through the park together before the evening meal. The date of her death is not known because records report a number of people named Jessie Sacket with differing dates. 

Friday, August 22, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #28 Harry Freely Mackin

Harry Freely Mackin

My grandmother was a girl with a family of all brothers. Harry was the youngest. He was born October 29, 1877 in Philadelphia, PA. He joined the Army. In January of 1900 he was in Co. H of the 5th Army Infantry in the Philippines. Then in June they went to Guantanamo, Cuba. After his two year enlistment was up he returned to the States and was living with his sister at 1209 Locust Ave. in Camden, NJ. On September 21, 1905 he married Mae Elizabeth Missimer. The 1910 Census lists him as living at 1825 Fillmore St., Camden, NJ. He was an iron worker on bridges. In 1912 he lived at 1725 S. 6th St., Camden, NJ. In 1913 when he registered for the WWI draft he resided at 560 Ferry Ave., Camden, NJ. The document stated he was and engineer and was 5’10” tall. In 1920 he lived at 1755 S. 6th St., in Camden and was a portable engineer. He continued to live in Camden throughout his life. His occupation changed over time. In 1930 he was a marine engineer. In 1931 he was a port engineer and later a construction engineer. He died on August 26, 1953 while living at 2525 Morgan Village, Camden, NJ. Paperwork lists his burial site as Beverly Cemetery but there is conflicting information that he was buried at the Veterans Cemetery in Honolulu, Hawaii according to the Find a Grave website.
Sources
1.       National Cemetery Administration, U.S. Veterans Gravesites, ca.1775-2006 (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006), www.ancestry.com, Database online.
2.       The National Archives at St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri; World War II Draft Cards (Fourth Registration) for the State of New Jersey; State Headquarters: New Jersey; Microfilm Series: M1986
3.       Database online. Year: 1880; Census Place: Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Roll: 1169; Family History Film: 1255169; Page: 21B; Enumeration District: 071; Image: 0044.
4.       Year: 1900; Census Place: Guantanamo, Cuba, Military and Naval Forces; Roll: T623_1838; Page: ; Enumeration District: 114; FHL microfilm: 1241838.
5.       Ancestry.com, 1910 United States Federal Census (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data - Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Was), Ancestry.com, Database online. Year: 1910; Census Place: Camden Ward 8, Camden, New Jersey; Roll: ; Page: ; Enumeration District: ; Image:.
6.       Database online. Year: 1920; Census Place: Camden Ward 8, Camden, New Jersey; Roll: T625_1023; Page: 8A; Enumeration District: 52; Image: .
7.       Ancestry.com, 1930 United States Federal Census (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.Original data - United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626,), Ancestry.com, Database online. Year: 1930; Census Place: Camden, Camden, New Jersey; Roll: ; Page: ; Enumeration District: ; Image:.
8.       Year: 1940; Census Place: Camden, Camden, New Jersey; Roll: T627_2396; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 22-128
9.       Ancestry.com, U.S. Army, Register of Enlistments, 1798-1914 (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.Original data - Register of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M233, 81 rolls); Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780’s-1917, Rec), Ancestry.com, Record for Harry F Mackin. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=USArmyEnlistments&h=996954&indiv=try.
10.   Ancestry.com, U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005), Ancestry.com, Registration State: New Jersey; Registration County: Camden; Roll: 1711989; Draft Board: 3. Record for Harry F Mackin. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=WW1draft&h=32717524&indiv=try.

11.   Ancestry.com, Web: Hawaii, Find A Grave Index, 1779-2012 (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012), Ancestry.com, Record for Harry F Mackin. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=WebSearch-3898&h=151298&indiv=try.

Sunday, August 17, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #27 Earl Moore

Earl Moore

My dad, Earl Mackin Moore was born on November 24, 1913 at home, 1209 Locust St., Camden, NJ to Charles Shoemaker Moore and Margaretta Virginia Mackin Moore. He was their seventh and last child. Although all six of his brothers’ and sisters’ births were registered the doctor forgot to register his. Fortunately his oldest sister was twenty-one and present for his birth. When WWII came around she swore a document to record his birth. He was baptized on February 14, 1914. He was a healthy child. Several of his siblings were not and a brother and sister died as infants. In 1919 his father died. Then in 1921 his mother and then his oldest brother died. His sister was unmarried at the time and unable to care for my father and his youngest sister. It was decided that they would go to the Pennsylvania Masonic Children’s Home in Elizabethtown to live. Unlike many orphanages in the 1920s this was a good place to live. The facilities were new and beautiful. The food was grown right on the grounds. There were sports and music. Education was in the Elizabethtown schools. When they reached high school they could choose
to continue in the public schools or go to the Patton Trade School. Patton was where my dad chose although he only remained one year. At sixteen he left the home and went to live with his sister Caroline in Gloucester City, NJ.
The 1940 census lists him as a laborer in a paper factory. When war broke out he was working in the New York Ship Yard, Camden, NJ. He applied for a commission in the Navy, was accepted but he had already received a draft notice for the Army. The Army refused to release him to the Navy. He entered the Army on May 8, 1942. He was assigned to the 1263d Combat Engineers and rose to First SGT of B Company.  He and his men accomplished such jobs and tearing down part of the Maginot line and repairing the autobahn so troops could move up. His men called him “Daddy” Moore since he was older and looked after the men. Reading an autograph book he had his men really seemed to like and admire
him. Stories my dad spoke of were more of the lighter moments in war. He was never a hunter but shot a deer and the company enjoyed venison for dinner that night. Another story was how he slept on top or a ¾ ton truck but nearly floated away in a heavy rain. Another story was crossing the Elbe to meet the Russians. He always said
“Oh, those Russian women!” They also came across a several concentration camps that had only been recently liberated.  Dad never spoke of this except to say that it was terrible things that the Nazis had done and that he could swear to the truth of those camps. After my mom died I found pictures of a concentration camp that had been hidden away. He also saw one of Hitler’s residences. He was discharged on January 29, 1946 and returned to Gloucester City.
He met my mom, Millicent who was a waitress after the war. They were married on November 16, 1948, the same month and day that his parents had been married on. Around that same time he became a patrolman on the Gloucester City Police Department. A few years later I was born. During those first years they lived in many houses that renting as apartments.  Actually it was at least seven different residences in eight years. My brother was born during those years. Then in 1956 they bought their first and only house. He was promoted first to Sergeant and then to Chief of Police about 1960.
He loved sports and “adopted” Gloucester City High School as his own. He rarely missed a football or basketball game whether home or away. That is some of my best memories since I usually went with him. He also was security for school dances and the proms. He also became very involved in Little
League baseball. He coached the Lions team for years, was LL president and later District 14 Administrator. Most nights during the season we would all pile in the car after dark to check on the field, turn off sprinklers or just make sure all was quiet. Then we would drive on to Shorty’s newsstand in Fairview to get the late evening paper. A real plus for the field was when the Philadelphia Phillies moved to Veterans’ Stadium they gave lights from old Connie Mack Stadium to the Little League. All they had to do was go over and retrieve them.  He remained active with District 14 LL right up to his death.

He was a terrific dad. He loved us so much and did things with us all the time. He wasn’t a very good disciplinarian. He never hit us and when he would holler at us he would say he was sorry afterwards. I was so lucky to have such loving parents who were people I could be proud of. 

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #26 Mary Hayes Mackin

Mary E. Hayes


            Mary Hayes was my great grandmother but she couldn’t be more distant to me than if we no relation to each other. Her parents, Patrick and Annabell Hayes were Irish immigrants and I haven’t discovered very much about them. She may not have even been Mary since there were times she used the name Bridget, her supposed sister’s name. She was born on June 29, 1853 in Philadelphia although there’s no birth certificate since neither Philadelphia nor Pennsylvania recorded births at that time. She was born on June 29, 1853. She married Charles A. McMechen on Oct. 18, 1870 in Philadelphia. As recorded in the Philadelphia City Archives in the 1870 volume on p. 143, they were married by George Moore of S. 4th St. The records are not very clear but it appears to have been a Methodist ceremony. They used the surname Mackin.
            Their children were: Charles Mackin, born about 1870, William, born about 1872, Margaretta Virginia, born Aug. 10, 1874, Thomas H., born about 1875, and Harry Freely, born Oct. 29, 1877.
            Something about her character made her family disassociate with her. Whether that was before or after her husband’s death is unknown. . She must have done something so bad that they never spoke to her or allowed her grandchildren access to her after that. After his death in 1913, she applied for his military pension from his Civil War service.

            While living at 921 Somerset St. in Gloucester City, NJ she must have made friends with the Etherington family. Bill Etherington, of Etherington’s Funeral Home, told to Midge Moore that he thought she was his relative since she was associated with his family. While living at this address she fell in her bedroom and broke her hip. This condition eventually led to her death of endocarditic on Nov. 21, 1930. O.A. Saunders of 1700 Broadway, Camden, NJ, signed her death certificate. Her son, Thomas Mackin of 122 Crown Pt. Rd. in Westville, NJ supplied personal information for her death certificate. She was buried beside her husband in Greenwood Knights of Pithius Cemetery on Arrott St., in Phila., PA.